The Wind-Dyed House, designed by Kazuhiko Kishimoto of acca, is a smart union between aesthetics and functionality. The residence is erected on a sloped terrain in Yokosaka, Japan; in response to the contours of the land and the weather conditions, it lies low and close to the cliff it inhabits but rises to meet the design challenges of the environment. The building includes two floors and a basement embedded into the earth, and features a low gable roof to allow the wind to flow over the building’s structure. The two residential floors of the building offer two different living experiences through textures and materiality. The first floor offers more privacy with its concrete interior walls and paper screens that lend windows a cloudy translucency. The second floor is an expansive, open-plan living space with glass panels that run along the entire length of the building to offer a stunning view of the sea below. As is the case with acca’s other projects, a clever use of levels enhances the interior space. A slight change in elevation on the second floor conveniently creates an endawa, a Japanese-style veranda that doubly functions as seating. Terraces on both of the floors not only continue to mask the building’s presence but also encourage the inhabitants of the house to enjoy the outdoors. Deep-set wooden eaves compose the building’s façade, and effectively cast shadows that further blend the building’s outline into the terrain. With these techniques, The Wind-Dyed House stands as work of architecture that is respectful of its natural surroundings without compromise on design.