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Flying Houses by Laurent Chehere

  • In his series entitled Flying Houses, French photographer Laurent Chehere elevates architecture to a new level – literally. His composite images liberate ordinary residences from their earth-bound existences to the expansive sky above. This depiction breaks convention in a manner that evokes the chimerical paintings by surrealist René Magritte; his works La Voix des airs and Le Château des Pyrénées come to mind, both sharing the concept of floating, displaced objects. Chehere relies on context, such as flying birds or hanging laundry, to make his photographs appear realistic instead of doctored. The electrical wires extending from each building and off the edges of the photograph instill a feeling of continued action, as if each house were a rogue balloon desperately trying to escape its tether to the ground. The effect is ethereal, and allows the public to appreciate the fundamental form of a house without being restrained by the XY-plane and waterline. With majesty, ingenuity, and a little help from technology, Chehere shows that building castles in the sky is not an impossible feat.

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    Kimberly ABOUT KIMBERLY LI - Kimberly is a graduate from MIT's Department of Architecture, and has recently joined the publication team at MIT OpenCourseWare. While architecture remains her first love, her interests encompass literature – epic poetry and Medieval romances are her favorite – and also fashion. She delights in various design projects, featured on her website "unkliched".
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