Gendarmenmarkt Square, Berlin 2009 © Reuters

And so the inevitable unraveling of Global Warming stares us in the face. One thousand ice sculptures sat at Gendarmenmarkt Square in Berlin, known as one of the most beautiful squares in all of Europe. They surrendered to the heat of a September afternoon in 2009 within less than a half an hour.

Gendarmenmarkt Square, Berlin 2009 © Reuters

This time Brazilian artist Nele Azevedo presented a similar installation was presented as part of the Festival of Queens in Northern Ireland and was a tribute to the Titanic victims. They sit, in common positions, one right beside the other – taking our place, representing the devastation that could affect mankind. With each passing minute their bodies begin to descend, hunch over, dripping down to a shrunk head and missing limbs until all that remains is a quiet puddle on a busy promenade.
As part of World Wildlife Fund for Nature these tiny ice statues carry a message speaking of the melting ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica. It gives a fair warning to weather changes in parts of the world which will in turn release too many greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. The Monumento Mínimo has been installed in cities all over the globe, as her work has become known internationally as climate change art.

Belfast Festival 2012 © Néle Azevedo

Belfast Festival 2012 © Néle Azevedo

Belfast Festival 2012 © Néle Azevedo

Belfast Festival 2012 © Néle Azevedo

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