The poignancy and precision of Japanese tea ceremonies can be quite beautiful, and this elegant tradition rests upon its practiced masters and their delicate tools. JCrafts captures a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the bamboo whisk, chasen, which is used during the ceremony to mix together powdered tea and hot water. Yamato Takayama is our guide in the journey, and through a series of photographs, we see his skilled hands carving the whisk from a single length of bamboo, splitting the fibers into strands shaved and curled – much in the way that one puts curls into a ribbon on a present. The craftsmanship and care that Takayama puts into his work is evident through the photos, which also manage to express a whimsicality in the whisk’s playful form.

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Kimberly

ABOUT KIMBERLY LI - Kimberly is a graduate from MIT's Department of Architecture, and has recently joined the publication team at MIT OpenCourseWare. While architecture remains her first love, her interests encompass literature – epic poetry and Medieval romances are her favorite – and also fashion. She delights in various design projects, featured on her website "unkliched".