Romaine Jacquet-Lagreze‘s skyline series, Vertical Horizon, is bound to cause a mixture of shocking vertigo and absolute awe due to its dizzying—and sometimes, claustrophobic—nature. Rather than taking photographs along the high rises of bustling Hong Kong city, Jacquet-Lagrèze aims towards the heavens and encloses the viewer inside the towering structures, all of which seem to race along as fast as the eye can see. The tilted perspective morphs some of the urban landscapes into strange kaleidoscopes of whirling steel, zooming into an endless, celestial tunnel with only one way out. Other pictures capture trees like veins along the skyline, or rounding floors that seem like the undersides of a mothership at the apex of a spire. This almost alien nature is only proof of how incredibly diverse the colors and shapes of Hong Kong’s skyscrapers and architecture truly are.

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Stephen is a Manhattan College graduate and Egan Award winner for short stories, holding a Bachelor's degree in English. He is easily distracted by tall buildings, and routinely gets lost in modern art museums and a wealth of Bronx hiking trails. Currently living in the quiet garden suburb of Queens, he also writes music and film reviews, and is presently working on publishing his own literary material.