#FoodieFriday: Play with Your Food

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This Foodie Friday, we’re sharing one of our favorite products for the kitchen. Oddly enough, it’s not actual food. It’s not even cookware. It’s a game. We’re talking about Foodie Dice, a fun little design that helps you cook creatively.

Based in Sonoma, California, Foodie Dice is a successfully crowd-funded, award-winning brand that helps you mix up fresh ingredients in more than 186,000 combinations. If you feel like you eat the same things all the time or tend to get a stuck wondering what to do with your CSA box, Foodie Dice can give you a boost. Rather than racking your brain or sifting through a seemingly endless trove of recipes, you can just play your hand.

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Roll the dice to settle on a cooking method, a protein (meaty and veggie options listed), a grain or starch, an herb, a seasonal vegetable, and a bonus ingredient like garlic or bacon. Roll again to add extra spices, wild cards like coconut and olives, and dessert. Odds are that you will end up with a tasty dinner you had not tried before.

To mix up your routine even more, check out the Mixology Dice. Quenching your thirst and refueling your imagination, the game will have you shaking and stirring spirit, sugar, liqueur, citrus, fruit, herbs, spices, and bitters into unique drinks. If you don’t have bartending experience, don’t worry. The kit comes with instructions for how to make everything from a cocktail to a rickey. The rest is variation.

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Both the Foodie and Mixology Dice sets come in glass tumblers with cork lids. The all-natural, American-made designs loosely resemble scientific beakers, so you know a great cooking experiment is bound to happen. Find the starter jars and the cloth pouch booster sets online in the Foodie Dice web shop.

Photography by Chris Robb

Holly

Holly

Holly is a poet from Kentucky. She grew up first in a Sears house, then on a farm. She studied English and Gender Studies at Mount Holyoke College and moved to Manhattan for love. As an occasional jewelry-maker and museum patron, Holly favors wearable and functional design but is eager to see work that challenges her aesthetics. Read more and connect by visiting her blog, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

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